Flower Essences for Fall Transitions

Tis the season for change! From starting school to new schedules, it’s that time of year when we step out of our lazy days of summer and back into the more focused pace of autumn. From an energetic point of view, fall is the time of year to invest our attention into long-term work. New resolutions and schedules started now can be more powerful than those we make with the change of the calendar year.

Flower essences can play a supportive role in making the change from summer to autumn and overcoming any hurdles that come with new schedules.

Walnut is the hero of transitions in the flower essence world. Walnut helps us to ease through transitions with openness and grace. It fosters growth from a deep inner place, which helps us move confidently down our new path.

Walnut would be useful for families sending children to school, especially for the first time. It can help the child to feel ready for the transition into school life, and for the parents who might be hesitant about this new stage.

Morning Glory is another useful flower essence during times of transition. Morning Glory helps the individual to come back into a natural rhythm of day/night cycles in a way that is in tune with the world around them.

Morning Glory would help to support a change in sleeping schedule for a child switching from a summer to school year pattern. It would also help young children to follow nature’s shift into the shorter evenings of autumn.

Blackberry is a great flower essence to use when creating new patterns. It helps us to pin vague goals into concrete plans and gives us the energetic “kick in the pants” to set things in motion.

Blackberry would be useful for a high school student struggling to put effort into his new fall classes. It would also help a mom to get herself started on a new morning routine.

Quaking Grass is an extremely useful flower essence during times of forming new communities. This essence helps the individual to appreciate both her own individuality and her place within the larger group.

Quaking Grass would help a quiet child who feels a bit lost within a classroom full of busy children. It would also support the development of a strong group dynamic in a new workplace.

Mallow is another flower essence helpful in group situations. It helps the individual to feel warm and trusting when developing new relationships.

Mallow would be useful with a student who feels too fearful of rejection to attempt new friendships in a class full of strangers.

As we can see, flower essences can be a great tool during this season of change!


Kim   |  Autumn, Flower Essences, Summer Blog Challenge   |  09 1st, 2011    | 


4 Responses to “Flower Essences for Fall Transitions”

  1. When you say use essences what does that mean? I have used some essential oils on my bean bag when I have a headache or sprinkled here and there, but what is the most common way to apply/use these?

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    Kim Reply:

    Flower essences are remedies made with flowers’ energetic imprints in water, whereas essential oils are the oils from the plans, so they’re very different products. Flower essences are similar to homeopathic remedies in the way they work on an energetic level. Essential oils work on a physical level, with the scent and the chemical properties of the oils. Flower essences and essential oils can work together really well (such as lavender flower essence and lavender essential oils used in combination for headaches).
    Flower essences are typically taken by mouth, 2-4 times a day for a month or so at a time. They can also be used in single doses during acute situations, such as taking Rescue Remedy after getting into a car accident. Flower essences can also be used in room sprays, in body lotions, and in epsom salts for baths.

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  2. That helps a lot, I didn’t realize the difference or that they could be taken orally. Very interesting how they can be applied for so many various situations.

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  3. I wish there’s also fall season here in the Philippines. FLORALIVE

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